About This Blog

My current research obsession is centered around purses and pouches from the European Middle Ages, and the accompanying hardware and passementerie. It is my hope to not only study extant items but also learn via reconstructive experiments; these will be limited for the most part to the textile components, however in the future I hope to explore the production of the metal frames.

23 August 2009

Brickstitch purse with gold: finished!

Based on the 14th century bag in the V&A Museum's collection, object 8313-1863

Embroidery pattern adapted from A Stitch Out of Time by T. J. Mitchell (aka Richard Wymarc).

Materials: 32-count linen ground, silk (unknown remnant) lining. Embroidery worked in Kreinik silk flosses (1119, 2015, 2017), DMC linen floss, and gold passing thread.

The drawstrings were worked with pairs of individual strands of the Kreinik floss in a broad lace of 5 loops; the suspension loop with individual strands in a lace bend round (braids #1 and #25 in Tak v Bowes Departed, respectively).

The side-stitching was woven with 16 2-hole cards threaded with individual strands of the Kreinik floss.



15 comments:

Becca said...

Your disgusting. It's criminally beautiful. I'm sad I can't see it in person.

Racaire said...

lovely! a great inspiration!

Louise Schelde said...

I´t looks fantastic! It´s great to see how you make the side strings.

Elina said...

Wow, it's beautiful! (I'm working with the same pattern in wool, this is an inspiration for finishing my pouch too.)

Dena Lenham said...

Absolutely beautiful!!! We'd love to show off your photos and link to this page from our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/kreinik.manufacturing.company).

Kathy Storm said...

This turned out really lovely, Taschen. The gold thread really adds something special. Beautiful!

Gina-B said...

This is truly beautiful work! Wonderfully precise. Thanks for sharing.

Lia de Thornegge said...

Oh, my... that's gorgeous. I want to make one Just Like That!

Can you write about exactly how you achieved the side-stitching and the loops at the top edges?

Also, how did you thread the closing cords in the pouch?

Tristán Z. said...

Thank you all for the compliments!

Lia, the side-stitching is essentially a tablet-woven band with a spiral weft (through the shed and then down into the fabric all in one pick). I tried to explain it as best as I could in a previous post, but feel free to email if anything is unclear. As for the loops (some people call them "ears"), this is just about a 3 cm portion of "regular" woven band that was just folded when I turned the corner. I think at some point I may need to draw a diagram; I certainly work better with pictures, and I'm sure many other people do as well!

Tristán Z. said...

Oh, and nothing fancy about threading the drawstrings.. I just opened a little hole up (carefully!!) with an awl, and threaded the drawstring right through.

Lia de Thornegge said...

I did read the previous post closely. I understand the side-stitching bit, but I was unclear how you got the "ears". But you just continue weaving for a little bit - THEN turn to do the upper opening. I think I understand now. Thank you for the clarification!

Racaire said...

Thank you, ordered the book :)
...but I would love to know how you make this kind of woven decoration at the 'head' of your tassels... I saw it on textile buttons,... but I still haven't found a how-to...
(I mean the golden decoration at the last pic)
:D

Tristán Z. said...

Racaire, the tutorial I use is this, which I got from one of Machteld's posts @ Medieval Silkwork.

They are a bit troublesome, I've found that - at least with the gold passing thread - it's easier to construct them directly over the tassel head. There will be less tightening necessary afterwards.

Racaire said...

Thank you very much! :)

fred said...

It's so beautiful !!! Congratulations